Halogen Heaters Running Costs

Halogen Heaters Running Costs - How much does it cost to run a halogen heater

Electric heating has evolved enormously in recent years. Today, heaters consume much less energy. It is also a guarantee of thermal comfort. Thanks to contemporary technologies and home automation, consumers also have an excellent way to control their heating with precision and to monitor their consumption in real-time.

One of the biggest concerns of users is the cost that is involved in running Halogen heaters in comparison to other available heaters. In this article, we will look at the approximate cost of running Halogen heaters in your home.

Most halogen heaters will run at 400, 800 or 1200 watts. This works out to be: at 400W = $0.08 or 6 pence per hour. At 800W = $0.16 or 12 pence per hour. At 1,200W = $0.24 or 18 pence per hour.

Let’s get into more details.

Is a Halogen Heater Cheap to Run?

Halogen heaters are generally cheaper to run than other heaters. Rather than depending on convection to circulate heat, halogen heaters radiate heat directly onto objects. As a result, halogen heaters are very fast in action and efficient, as well as inexpensive to operate.

They’re also lightweight and easy to transport. Infrared halogen heaters are comparatively cheap to use, and thus, they have emerged as the most cost-effective option for household electric heaters.

Infrared Halogen Heaters should be the first choice for anyone living in a poorly insulated home or who is already paying high energy bills as a result of using inefficient and expensive conventional heating methods like fan heaters, convectors, oil, and space heaters.

Does a Halogen Heater Use a Lot of Electricity?

No, halogen heaters do not use a to of electricity by comparison with other heaters. The higher the watt rating of an appliance, the more it will cost to run.

As a result, the question would be whether halogen heaters consume less electricity. Halogen heaters have a low power rating when compared to other heating methods.  The energy consumption of a halogen heater is proportional to the power output and the length of time it is used at that power output.

People frequently inquire about how much it will differ from central heating. They differ from central heating in that you can quickly turn an electric heater on and off, and the heat is directed rather than heating the entire room.

People also regularly ask, “Is a halogen heater energy efficient?” The honest answer is; they both are and aren’t. It all depends on what you want to accomplish. It would be inefficient for heating an entire house; you’d be better off with central heating.

Yes, a halogen heater would be more energy efficient for heating a smaller area or a specific room in the house.

What Is The Cost To Run A Halogen Heater?

Because halogen heaters have a low power rating (but create less heat), they are more or less the cheapest radiant heaters, while oil-filled radiators are often the cheapest convector heaters because they feature a thermostat to adjust the temperature.

There are standard calculations already provided by the Centre for Sustainable Energy; a 2kW fan heater or fan heater will cost 40 cents per hour to run; while a 1.5kW oil-filled radiator will cost you 29 cents per hour. However, a 1.2kW halogen heater costs around 25 cents per hour to run.

*Based on the US average price tariff

A 1,000W (1Kw) halogen heater = $0.21 or 15 pence per hour

*Average Electricity Prices Around The World

You should also consider that there are costs of replacing halogen heater bulbs over time. Halogen heater bulbs can last from anywhere between 500 and 5000 hours depending on use. For more information, check out our article on how long do halogen heater bulbs lasts.

Country

Costs in National Currency (Per kWh)

United States

$0.13

Canada

$0.13

United Kingdom

£0.14

Australia

$0.33

New Zealand

$0.29

Calculating Different Halogen Heater Running Costs With Examples

For the halogen heater running costs table below, we will take the example of someone living in North America. Typically, you would pay about  $0.13 per kWh of electricity as per the table above.

The most common hal0ogen heater is the 1200W with three power output settings:

  • 400W
  • 800W
  • 1200W​

Below is the running costs at each wattage:

Power (W)

1 Hour Running Costs ($)

2 Hour Running Costs ($)

3 Hour Running Costs ($)

400

0.05

0.10

0.16

800

0.10

0.21

0.31

1,200

0.16

0.31

0.47

How Much Does It Cost To Run A 400 – Watt Heater For 24 Hours?

Once the power (or Wattage) of an electrical appliance is known, it’s relatively easy to employ a simple formula as a way of determining how much it would cost to use the said appliance for an hour.
According to the Centre for Sustainable Energy, a 1,000watts (1kW) halogen heater = $0.21 or 15 pence per hour.

We are dealing with 400 watts in this instance, and a quick calculation shows us that:
400W = $0.08 or 6 pence per hour.

Multiplied by 24 hours, that adds up to $1.98 or 144 pence per day.

How Much Does It Cost To Run A 500 – Watt Halogen Heater For 24 Hours?

 

Total energy usage is connected directly to how much power and how long the power is used when it comes to halogen heaters.

Going back to the formula provided by the Centre for Sustainable Energy,
1,000watts (1kW) halogen heater = $0.21 or 15 pence per hour, but we need to solve for 500 watts.

Simple arithmetic shows us that,
500W = $0.10 or 7.5 pence per hour
Multiplied by 24 hours, that adds up to $2.48 or 180 pence per day.

How much does it cost to run a 1500 watt heater for 24 hours?

The total energy usage of any halogen heater is connected directly to how much power it can consume over time.

Time in this instance is 24 hours. We are about to calculate the running costs for a halogen heater with a power output of 1,500 watts.

Using the standard formula provided by the Centre for Sustainable energy:

1,000watts (1kW) halogen heater = $0.21 or 15 pence per hour.

Solving for 1,500 watts, we arrive at $0.31 or 22.5 pence per hour.

Multiplied by 24 hours, that adds up to $7.43 or 540 pence per day.

How Much Does It Cost To Run A 2000 – Watt Halogen Heater For 24 Hours

As mentioned previously, the total energy usage of any halogen heater is connected directly to how much power is consumed over time.

A 2000 – watt halogen heater will consume a lot more power than a 400-watt variant and so forth.

Now for the math, using the standard formula provided by the Centre for Sustainable Energy,
1,000watts (1kW) halogen heater = $0.21 or 15 pence per hour.
Since we are working with 2,000 watts, 1000 watts in 2 places, we can multiply $0.21 or 15 pence by 2.

Hence, 2,000 watts = $0.41 or 30 pence per hour.
Multiplied by 24 hours, that adds up to $9.91 or 720 pence per day.

How Much Does It Cost To Run A Halogen Heater In Ireland?

The Republic of Ireland uses the Euro as its main currency, there is a hundred cents in one Euro. Electricity providers work out the amount of power the customer uses over a specified period of time, then they multiply that value by their billing rates (taking value-added taxes, PSOs, and other miscellaneous charges into consideration) and adding up the total as your final bill.

To figure out how much it costs to run halogen heaters in Ireland, we have to find out how much 1 kilowatt of power costs per hour.

Using the standard average electricity rates, Ireland’s 1-kilowatt hour(1kWh) of power costs about 28 cents (considering Value-added taxes and other charges).

Now that we have that established, let’s assume you have a 400-watt halogen heater that you use for 24 hours.

1000 watts = 28 cents per hour
We can calculate 400 watts to be 11.2 cents per hour.

Multiplying that figure by 24 hours, we get $3.17 or 2.68 euros per day.
You can tweak the calculation to fit your appropriate Wattage.

How To Lessen My Halogen Heater Electricity Costs?

To lessen your halogen heater electricity cost, consider the following adjustments in your home:

  1. Get a good halogen heater that is energy efficient
  2. Wear more and thicker clothes
  3. Let the Sun Heat Things Up
  4. Close off Unused Rooms.
  5. Cook or Bake at Home. The extra heat helps.
  6. Turn the Thermostat Down. You could also install a smart thermostat.
  7. Make Sure Doors and Windows Are Closed Tightly
  8. Keep Heat From Escaping From Your Ducts. Seal them up tightly
  9. Use Ceiling Fans. They will help distribute the warm air.
  10. Add insulation